Journalism in Canada: Freedom Feature with Noé Chartier

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Montreal journalist Noé Chartier describes what motivates him in his work as a reporter. Through his conversation with Barry W. Bussey, he demonstrates his balanced approach as he thoughtfully considers multiples sides to different issues.

Listen in as Mr. Chartier discusses recent topics he has covered for the Epoch Times, including federal travel mandates, government censorship, and recent French language legislation in Quebec.

Mr. Chartier raises some important questions. For instance, he notes that the government is right to say that there is a lot of nastiness online. Is increased regulation the best way to address harm, or will that drive extremist activity underground, where it becomes harder to monitor?

What about the use of the Emergencies Act? The government has stated that the Act was invoked in response to requests from law enforcement. Given that the various police chiefs involved have all testified that they did not advise or ask for the Act to be invoked, which agency made the request?

Regarding censorship, Mr. Chartier also points out that Bill C-11 contains a provision allowing the government to regulate user-generated content on the internet; despite concerns raised, the government has been unwilling to remove this clause. The bill also makes specific reference to serving the “needs and interests of… racialized communities” and Canadians of diverse “sexual orientations, gender identities, and expressions,” leading some to speculate that individuals may face censorship if their views diverge from the government ideology on identity politics.

Check out www.epochtimes.com for more articles and observations from Mr. Chartier.


Please note the views expressed by the individual(s) in this video are their own, and do not necessarily reflect the views or principles of the First Freedoms Foundation.

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